Sunday, 6 November 2016

The Gilfoy Family Photos

G'day, which is quite appropriate here, given the material that is persented! Some more photographs have arrived, regarding the Gilfoy family, so we thought it might be a great idea to give them a page of their own.
I might not get out much but I coyuldnt believe my eyes at this lot of photos, it really is a family history and we are very grateful to the Gilfoy family for providing us with the ermission to use them.
The 3 brothers, Arthur Harold Herbert George Gilfoy are all shown in various modes in and out of uniform. Also shown are the newspaper clips that me, Chris and Laurie screwed our eyes up looking at several times, wondering if this was such and such in the photos, so as a result I will be trawlin back through the photos in the older posts and doing a sort of identity parade again.
The fantastic one of the boys down in Luton was on Mrs Welch's scrapbook without names and the sepia rendered it too poor to clarify properly.


The family had developed a tradition of military service and we now know that Grandfather Gilfoy had served in the Boer War (1899-1901)

 Mr and Mrs. Tim and Ellen Gilfoy in the autumn of their years, having lost three sons to a war must have been a terrible burden to them i nsite of having a big family. Tim would have known what war and its cost meant but this would have been little consolation.



Two brothers in 5th Lincolns, one has been identified as Herbert but it is another brother I think, he also has campaign ribbons from previous military service.

                 Group photo taken in Luton most likely as part of the photo shoot by the press. Harold is at the front, grinning. He apears to have filled out from his earlier photos. Back left is Sidney Dixon whom we have said earlie was the projectinist at the Oxford cinema. Ernest Weston at Back right. 

     The photo which is perfectly produced is the one which appeared in the press. See below. The names are as follows but not neccessarily correct.  Lance Corporal Sidney Dixon (correct) Lance Corporal T.W.Tonks (no TW listed only George, William who was killed in action and his brother, Lance Corporal William Austin Douglas Tonks but there is a family resemblance-if it is George he has shaved off his tache) A.E.Clapson (correct) and W.(Walter) Blythe Machine Gun Corps, who was killed in action serving with the Machine Gun Corps after he was transferred there, with a batch that included Sindey Jack Robinson. 
Harold at the bottom cross legged.   News clip below.




The photo shown shows the men in relaxed mode. Names will follow. Sgt Herbert Pickard has his arm round the pooch. Sgt Anthony Nicholson is in braces at the right. More on this group over the next few days.

Herbert Gilfoy, casualty of the Great War, succumbing to his wound after the Australian Infantry 59th Battalion went over the top at Fromelles on the Somme losing two thirds of a thousand strength, 274 of which were missing. More on Herbert and his life in Australia here, very good webpage https://shireatwar.com/2016/07/22/74-fromelles-59-battalion-h-gilfoy-v-grenville-i-j-lear-a-liddelow-f-a-lidgett-l-j-neil-s-sleigh/



       Lincolns base camp some time in 1915, somewhere in France.  This is the transport column.

Herbert in peacetime, looking the cool dude in his Sunday best. The Barton boys polished up well back in the day, young uns take note!


The Gilfoy Family Photos

G'day, which is quite appropriate here, given the material that is persented! Some more photographs have arrived, regarding the Gilfoy family, so we thought it might be a great idea to give them a page of their own.
I might not get out much but I coyuldnt believe my eyes at this lot of photos, it really is a family history and we are very grateful to the Gilfoy family for providing us with the ermission to use them.
The 3 brothers, Arthur Harold Herbert George Gilfoy are all shown in various modes in and out of uniform. Also shown are the newspaper clips that me, Chris and Laurie screwed our eyes up looking at several times, wondering if this was such and such in the photos, so as a result I will be trawlin back through the photos in the older posts and doing a sort of identity parade again.
The fantastic one of the boys down in Luton was on Mrs Welch's scrapbook without names and the sepia rendered it too poor to clarify properly.


The family had developed a tradition of military service and we now know that Grandfather Gilfoy had served in the Boer War (1899-1901)

 Mr and Mrs. Tim and Ellen Gilfoy in the autumn of their years, having lost three sons to a war must have been a terrible burden to them i nsite of having a big family. Tim would have known what war and its cost meant but this would have been little consolation.



Two brothers in 5th Lincolns, one has been identified as Herbert but it is another brother I think, he also has campaign ribbons from previous military service.

                 Group photo taken in Luton most likely as part of the photo shoot by the press. Harold is at the front, grinning. He apears to have filled out from his earlier photos. Back left is Sidney Dixon whom we have said earlie was the projectinist at the Oxford cinema. Ernest Weston at Back right. 

     The photo which is perfectly produced is the one which appeared in the press. See below. The names are as follows but not neccessarily correct.  Lance Corporal Sidney Dixon (correct) Lance Corporal T.W.Tonks (no TW listed only George, William who was killed in action and his brother, Lance Corporal William Austin Douglas Tonks but there is a family resemblance-if it is George he has shaved off his tache) A.E.Clapson (correct) and W.(Walter) Blythe Machine Gun Corps, who was killed in action serving with the Machine Gun Corps after he was transferred there, with a batch that included Sindey Jack Robinson. 
Harold at the bottom cross legged.   News clip below.




The photo shown shows the men in relaxed mode. Names will follow. Sgt Herbert Pickard has his arm round the pooch. Sgt Anthony Nicholson is in braces at the right. More on this group over the next few days.

Herbert Gilfoy, casualty of the Great War, succumbing to his wound after the Australian Infantry 59th Battalion went over the top at Fromelles on the Somme losing two thirds of a thousand strength, 274 of which were missing. More on Herbert and his life in Australia here, very good webpage https://shireatwar.com/2016/07/22/74-fromelles-59-battalion-h-gilfoy-v-grenville-i-j-lear-a-liddelow-f-a-lidgett-l-j-neil-s-sleigh/



       Lincolns base camp some time in 1915, somewhere in France.  This is the transport column.

Herbert in peacetime, looking the cool dude in his Sunday best. The Barton boys polished up well back in the day, young uns take note!


Sunday, 10 July 2016

Redoubt Copse The planting of the Memorial Trees


 We are proud at last to post some of the photos realting to the Redoubt Copse in memory of the seventeen men and boys who never returned from the the Hohenzollern Redoubt battle at Loos en Gohelle on the 13th October 1915.



The Barton army cadets of the Army Cadet Force working hard at getting the stuck into the ground for the plantation of the oaks.  They should be rightly proud of their efforts and the appreciation from the people of Barton in taking time out of their schedules in undertaking the task.



                     The memorial plaque with the donating bodies shields and badges underneath.  The Barton Upon Humber Lions, The Rotary Club, the Civic Society and the Living Memorial Trust and individual Barton people and people with relatives were among the many generous doners.


    Adults were also ''enlisted''.  This is a very proud day for many people in the area, and thanks are due to everyone who bought this plan together.  More news will follow on the event, and the scheme behind the planting of the Oak trees.

Friday, 16 October 2015

13th Octobver 1915 One Hundred Years of History

For those who attended the memorial service in Barton, it was I am told a very fitting tribute and I cant wait to find out a bit more. 

Unfortunately for me, I was too ill to make the journey, not a well man at present, but rest assured I will be back to find out more about what went on.  From what I am told the spectacle of the cadets, boots shining, crowds gathered, and the battle standard of the fighting 5th must have been something to behold, and what a coup by Lawrence Robinson to get the Lord Lieutenant of Lincolnshire up to the ceremony, well done Laurie, everyone knows what immense work you have put into the project.

People came from miles around and I may be misquoting here but upward of 300 people in presence.
More than everything, I feel, it was a chance for people to catch up, someone said that there were people there who they hadn't seen for FORTY YEARS! That is So well done to everyone who made this a special and fitting occasion. 

Reaching out to the town, it must also be noted here of the sterling work Laurie has done in performing his lectures, very skilfully it must be added, to the children of ''Council School''.
''Mister Robinson'' as the little 'uns know him, has kept himself very busy in this and other respects, including his work for Barton Living Memorial Trust. 


A lot has been said about the museum exhibition and this has been bought up at the 13th October ceremony.  A lot of hard work was put in by everyone on this and you all know who you are, and I have the feeling that it will rise again.  Either through embarrassment or political agenda/other the museum directors took it down, and without any real explanation.  It is ours, the people of Barton, we made it, it belongs to us, as does the museum incidentally, a gift to the people of Barton; I digress-we will surely find a new home for it. All it needs is a roof over it's head!

If anyone with a business has space to house it please get in touch! Look up the contact details on the blog.


In the meantime I am pleased to publish the following photos, which were of the ceremony for the plaques with the names added to Barton Cenotaph in July 2014.  Also some shots of the exhibition.

Click on the photos for full view!!








The main wall of the exhibition with photos of the Barton men resplendent.  The exhibition attracted hundreds of visitors and was put together with a lot of love and attention to detail.









The Army Chaplain for Lincolnshire giving the oration for the unveiling of the plaques in Baysgarth Museum




Some of the silk postcards postcards loaned by the people of Barton to Our Peoples Exhibition of The Great War.


Bartons unique Welcome Home Cards given to soldiers and sailors returning from Conflict, Home Service or general Foregin service suring the War to End All Wars.






                                                                       More Silks



The shell is a piece of trench art with the inscription From Fritz and Otto etched into it.  An entrenching tool is there next to it.
 



    German Coalscuttle helmet, shell noses wire pickets and entrenching tool shrapnel and vartious artifacts.



 
Crowds gathered and seated at the dedication ceremony 
 
 
 
Mrs Marjorie Ball reading an oration at the Memorial Service
 
 
 
 
LAST POST courtesy of the Salvation Army
 
 
 
Lawrence Robinson reading his oration
 
 
The plaques that were installed into the Memorial last year.  A result of 20 years research, and rightfully these names were added to the Barton Cenotaph.
 
 
 
 
 
Please if anyone has better photos than mine, which wouldn't take much doing, please forward them to me at magiclard@yahoo.com 

Sunday, 27 September 2015

Robert Barker Dragoon Guards 1915 A letter.

 
The following letter was received from Marsh Lane regarding the death of Robert Barker of The Dragoon Guards. His brother William had been lost early in the war. This was relatively early on in the war, but letters like these were soon arriving into the country in their thousands by the day.  The letter is reproduced verbatim, with thanks to Laurence Robinson and the family who procured this letter for us. Fred Credland lived on Butts Road. I have a photo of Bob in the 1914 section. At present
 
21st May 1915
40 Marsh lane Barton upon Humber


Dear George and Cissy

You will no doubt have received the card from Jennie telling you the sad news that poor Bob Barker had fallen in action, but I thought that you would like to know a little more about it, his father received a letter from Bobs captain on Thursday morning so I went down to see him, the letter said that on the 13th of this month the royal dragoons had reinforced the tenths hussars when an high explosive shell fell at Bobs feet. He was killed instantly and a chap called corporal brown stayed behind with him and took all his personal belongings off him. The captain finished by speaking in the highest terms of poor bob and said that he died like a brave soldier fighting for king and country to the last.  He also said that he was the only officer left out of the whole lot so they must have been beat up very badly. I was having my breakfast
when Gertie came on her bike and told me about it, I went at once to Bobs home and his father was broken down with grief and it made me cry too when I read the letter, I had so looked forward to him coming home again. If I could do better and work all the day I could not help but think about him, what good times we had together and he bid me farewell on the new Holland pier that night when he went back to the front. He seemed so cheerful and so brave. My word, but it’s hard for the Barkers to have lost them both, I shall go to church on the Sunday morning as I think I ought to do. When he was here the last time he was saying that he had not seen his brother William since he enlisted, but they will have met again now, I feel sure, for I think god in his mercy would forgive him his sins and he was called at short notice, and I am certain he would meet his death as he met everything ( with a smile on his face) I have got a few photographs taken of him, the one he sent from India and I will send one as I know you would like one. Well I think this is all time I almost forgot to tell you can remember how the sunset when bobs was killed how it glowed, when I called you to the gate. I never had much faith in signs and omens but that night must have been a sign that bob had sent it seemed so queer. I will now draw to a close with saying that I do think that god in his redeeming can and will have mercy on poor bobs soul and then we shall meet him again in that land  where we shall be no more, for no braver and kinder that bob barker would be wished for. Jennie sends her best and along with my beliefs

Your loving brother Fred.
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Monday, 8 June 2015

ROUND AND ABOUT THE BARTON VILLAGES 1914-1918

This was inevitable.  The interest has gone on  a lot and we have found ourselves staring into lots of old newspapers, and wondering about the outlying villages along the banks of the Humber and further in.
 
Here are some biopics etc  of other men from round and about the low villages, Barrow, Goxhill, Thornton Curtis, New Holland and the farms.  As these places are too small to warrant their own pages, and the fact that many of them came to Barton to train as territorials (thought New Holland lads would have most likely enlisted in Hull, I thought it only appropriate to include them as well-in fact it only seemed fair. 
There is a plethora of information on the War Memorials websites.  Nobody else has done it as far as I know except for the boys of the Roll of Honour lads who have done an amazing job. So please note, this section is incomplete. I appreciate your patience. Contributions are very welcome.

For further information on the Barton villages please refer to this website the link shown below.

http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Lincolnshire

March 1918 news clip

Fred Drury Carlile 
Private 20641 Lincolnshire Regt.
Died 23-3-1918

Fred Drury Carlile whose parents lived at college farm in Thornton was reported dead -he died on 23rd March 1918 gassed and wounded after being carried out by Clarvis, a friend from S. Ferriby.  It would seem that he was caught up on the 21st in the Spring Offensive.
It would appear that a brother C W Carlile had been killed earlier in the War.


Kenneth F Bean of Scawby ad been killed earlier in the war as an officer with the Royal Scots; his brother, Noel was so badly wounded that in April 1918 his parents were called to his bedside in France as he wasn't expected to live.  By the look of things he made it. 

Arthur Brumpton of Wootton Severely wounded March 1918 in German Offensive.
He was in the 21st Casualty Clearing station  (HDM) Arthur succumbed to his injuries a month later-his parents lived at Swallow Lane in Wootton.



Arthur Brumpton
2nd/5th Lincolnshire Regt  
Pte. 241369
Buried at Auxi Le Chateau  pas de Calais

After gassing and an operation Arthur Brumpton is slowly progressing.

April march 18

1918 Pte William Tong of Barrow wdd brother C Tong killed a month prior

Sgt Tom Jarvis of Goxhill wounded in knee Canadian hospital

Tom Jackson one of the Lincolns company that did not fall back during great retreat now reported wounded and prisoner in Germany as is Phil Cork S Ferriby.

Captain Rolf Rudolph Elwes Coldstream Guards since start of conflict has been wounded and gassed-became a RC chaplain at 65 years old 6mths pow. and was a founder and director of universal motors ltd





Pte Arthur Stamp son of Mr Mrs W Stamp Royal Oak Goxhill missing since 21.3.18




Phil Cork is wounded and a prisoner in Germany commd
home and Sgt Tom Jackson POW both are of S.Ferriby.












Private Garnet Atkins (sic) of Goxhill.













Lieutenant Benjamin Hutchinson MC 11th Battn. east Yorkshire Regt. lost his life on 3rd May 1917. His name is inscribed on the Arras Memorial having no known resting place.


                                     A missing notice for Walter Turner who was not to return from the War.










                                  C H Thompson of Barrow upon Humber.

As an example of crossed lines and confusion, the newspapers have wrongly identified Charles Thompson of Barrow. The rest of the detail is correct.  Charles is buried at Cabaret Rouge Cemetery.


Ernest Jackson of Ferriby, killed in a naval accident in home waters.  Also here is Corporal J Harrison of Barton, West Yorkshire Regiment.


                                                         Sgt John Harrison of New Holland



                                                Frederick Clayton was lost on the Hohenzollern Redoubt.







Leonard Franklin Sherwoods reported as missing in March 1918 son of Robert Franklin New Holland

Both Leonard and his brother Bernard appear on the New Holland War Memorial but neither are listed with the CWGC.

Arthur Stamp Royal Oak Goxhill s of Mr & Mrs W Stamp


Pte George Richardson of Elsham wounded and in hospital.

END article


Lt Henry Sharpley of Kesteven killed in action son of Hy Sharpley of Limber and rel to J Sharpley JP of Boswell.  He appears on the Ulceby War Memorial and his name is above the door of Providence House Barton. His family gave the house to the people of Barton as a memorial to him.



Sgt F Baker Worlaby gunshot wounds and trench foot in hospital light trench mortar


Lewis G Walker Worlaby not heard of for 6 weeks and family would like information from any comrade to furnish them with details of his whereabouts.  Apparently Lewis made it back to England.







The following casualty lists are undated but provide a little insight into what the families dreaded reading in the press.

This selection is from 25th April 1918, when the British army was being scattered badly, totally run ragged and scores of people were dead and missing. It includes the entry for Charles Franklin.  The casualty lists appeared every day during the war.

Alf Butler Royal Engineers of South Ferriby is seriously injured.

Sgt E Baker Worlaby wounds and trench foot at Boulogne.

L/Cpl Arthur Walters New Holland missing wince March 23rd. 

Pte Jim Parkinson Lincolns reported missing from New Holland one of four sons at the front.

Arthur Walters son of Mrs B Walters stretcher bearer missing since

R W Isaac Elsham you will recall he was severely wounded during the shelling of the Mercia has been missing since. 

note: Corporal 51392  (204627) (formerly 55036 Lance Corporal)  Lincs. Yeomanry) Reginald W. Isaac was captured at Wytschaete Termonde? during the German offensive in March 1918 and was a prisoner at Dulmen POW camp. 
He had been aboard the Mercian with the Lincolnshire Yeomanry when she was torpedoed by a submarine in September 1915
It should be borne in mind that among this list were 3 Barton men, and many from Louth, Crowle and various villages dotted about North Lincs.



William Tong of the Lincolns of Barrow has died of wounds. Son Mr and Mrs Charles Tong of Barrow, this is the second son to make supreme sacrifice.


Late in 1916 Fred Benson of Ferriby was bought before JP Hopper for overstaying his leave.





Private 27835 Arthur Rusling, a horseman of Wootton Wold, who fell in action with the 2nd Lincolns; his name is inscribed on the Thiepval memorial on the Somme. He lost his life on 27th Feb.1917. As seen he was called up in 1916. His name is not on Wootton War Memorial.